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June 8th - 12th, 2020, UPF, Barcelona

The 5th VPH Summer School will be held in Barcelona, Spain, on June 8-12, 2020, and will focus on Tackling Complexity in Health ">.

The VPH Summer School series is co-organized by BCN MedTech at the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF) and by the Virtual Physiological Human Institute (VPHi), with the collaboration of the UPF department of Experimental and Health Science and the QUAES Foundation.

It provides junior engineers, early researchers and medical doctors with an integrative view of state-of-the-art research for in silico medicine, following a complete pipeline from basic science and clinical needs, to model application. The Summer School has the support of the European Society of Biomechanics, of the Spanish Network of Excellence in Biomechanics, CompBioMed and the QUAES-UPF Chair.

This summer school includes 15 morning lectures plus one honorary VPH lecture, given by leading international researchers

The key methodological and technological concepts are enriched by afternoon hands-on sessions that stand for 16+ hours of transversal training in in silico medicine technologies during the whole week, under the supervision of expert researchers. A best hands-on award sponsored by the QUAES-UPF Chair.

The last afternernoon of the VPH Summer School will host a round table, gathering patients, physicians, researchers and public authority representatives to discuss on In silico Medicine and new medical technologies for the society: Awareness, expectations and effective capacity

The Summer School also includes poster sessions with the best VPHi poster award

Location: UPF Poblenou Campus (Roc Boronat 138, Barcelona)

 


Registration fees (lunch included): Early reduced*: 150 € - Early regular: 250 € (until April 15th, 2020) | Late reduced*: 175 € - Late regular: 300 €

* Applies to students** (BSc, MSc, PhD) and to VPHiESB and BiB members

**A one-year individual VPHi Student Membership is included in the registration fees for students, upon request


 

- Concerned about Coronavirus? Check the dedicated UPF webpage and updated contamination data worlwide and per region -

 


If you want to receive updates about the programme, please leave your e-mail here or follow us on Twitter (@bcnvph)

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Programme at a glance


Poster Sessions

From Monday to Thursday, the VPH Summer School hosts an afternoon Poster session that provides Delegates with the oportunity to disseminate their research and discuss with other scientists from different in silico modelling fields, including with the morning Keynote and Plenary Speakers. Along the week all posters are being anonymously evaluated, for the VPHi Best Poster Award to be announced on Friday afternoon. Posters are not previously peer-reviewed, but Delegates need to inform whether they will contrinbute to the poster sessions, through the online registration



Guided tour of the Mare NostrumBarcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS)

A visit to the Barcelona Supercomputing Center  is programmed for Thursday, June 11th, at 16:30 (until 17:30).
Limited to 30 participants (Based on explicit request and per order of registration)


Detailed programme

8
Jun 2020
  • 08:30 - 09:00
    Registration - Hall Auditorium
  • 09:00 - 09:30
    Welcome - Auditorium
  • 09:30 - 11:00
    Keynote Lecture 1 - Laura Souceck (Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology, ICREA) - Auditorium - Chair: Miguel Ángel González Ballester, UPF, ICREA

    A new generation of mini-proteins for cancer treatment

    Abstract: Our focus is the Myc oncoprotein, whose deregulation is implicated in almost all human cancer types. We have designed a Myc dominant negative, Omomyc, to investigate the therapeutic benefit of inhibiting Myc in cancer. We demonstrated that Myc inhibition has a remarkable therapeutic index in many mouse models of cancer, while only causing mild and reversible side effects in normal tissues. We also showed that Myc is a safe pharmacological target for many, perhaps all, cancers. Our goal is now to push such a therapeutic approach further towards the clinic. To do so we are making use of a new generation of Myc inhibitory cell-penetrating miniproteins, which are supposed to be tested in clinical trials in 2021. These innovative treatments could boost our therapeutic arsenal against the majority of human cancers.

    Biosketch: Laura Soucek graduated in 1996 in Biological Sciences at University La Sapienza in Rome, Italy. She obtained her PhD in Genetics and Molecular Biology at the National Research Center, in Rome. In 2001 she joined University of California San Francisco, initially as postdoctoral fellow and later, in 2006 as Assistant Researcher. There she published in high impact international journals. Since early 2011, Dr. Soucek heads the Mouse Models of Cancer Therapies Group at the Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), in Barcelona. She received prestigious awards and grants from AACR, the Miguel Servet Program, the FERO Foundation, the Association for International Cancer Research, the European Research Council, FIS and BBVA. In October 2014 she was appointed ICREA Research Professor. In December 2014 she founded a spin-off company, Peptomyc S.L., where she is CEO. In April 2015, she became Associate Professor at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

  • 11:00 - 11:30
    Coffee Break - Hall Auditorium
  • 11:30 - 12:30
    Plenary Lecture 1 - Vicenta Llorente-Cortés (IIBB-CSIC; Sant Pau Biomedical Research Institute) - Auditorium - Chair: Jérôme Noailly, UPF

    Molecular biomarkers and therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis

    Abstract: Our research group focuses on 1) Search of new molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal cholesterol accumulation in the vasculature to find innovative treatments in atherosclerosis, and 2) Identification of new peptidic and omic biomarkers useful in the detection of mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease. The group has been pioneer in identifying the main processes involved the formation of foam cells from smooth muscle cell (SMC) origin. We showed that SMC-foam cells acquire a phenotype highly prothrombotic that plays a crucial role in plaque destabilization and evolution towards clinical events.  We have consistently demonstrated that the lipoprotein receptor, LRP1, through its pathological function of facilitating the transfer of cholesterol from atherogenic lipoproteins to vasculature and myocardium, contributes to the onset and development of several diseases of great prevalence in our society such as atherosclerosis, ischemic and diabetic myocardiopathies. In addition, the group has now an extensive productive work identifying new proteic and epigenomic biomarkers useful to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Currently, we are investing a big effort to develop new compounds to target SMC and cardiomyocyte cholesterol loading through regulation of LRP1 interaction with atherogenic lipoproteins. Currently, we have available in the group peptides and antibodies with proven efficacy in atherosclerosis that could be potentially useful in several cardiomyopathies. To advance these compounds towards the clinics, we have established strategical collaborations with clinicians from SantPau’s and other national and international traslational groups  

    Biosketch: Dr. Vicenta Llorente-Cortés obtained her PhD in Biomedicine at Autonomous University of Barcelona in 1995 after a three year stay at Bern University (Switzerland) working as a PhD student. Between 1996 and 2006, she worked as post-doctoral researcher in CSIC/IR-SantPau’s Hospital group.  At 2006, she become CSIC Head Scientist and Coordinator of the group Lipids and Cardiovascular Pathology (CSIC/IIB-SantPau). She has achieved until now ninety-two international publications in medium/high impact journals, nine consecutive projects from the Instituto de Salud Carlos III, two projects from Fundació Marató TV3-Malalties Cardiovasculars (2008 and 2014) and two projects focused on innovation; one project Llavor (2014) and one project Retos-Colaboración (MINECO 2015) coordinated by a company to develop anti-atherosclerotic peptide-based compounds. The group has acquired a large translational aspect by developing new potential therapeutic tools and animal models suitable for proof-of-concept studies. She is co-inventor of three patents, one of them granted in USA and Europe.

  • 12:30 - 13:30
    Plenary Lecture 2 - Emma Blain (Cardiff University) - Auditorium - Chair: Maria Segarra-Queralt, UPF

    Mechano-regulation of articular cartilage homeostasis

    Abstract: Emma's research targets the  cellular and molecular events that are involved in the mechano-regulation of articular cartilage tissue homeostasis, the mechanism/s that propagate mechanically-mediated joint degeneration i.e. osteoarthritis and identification of therapeutic targets for intervention. Specific research interests are:

    - Investigating mechano-regulation of microRNAs in articular cartilage.
    - Investigating why ankle osteoarthritis only develops as a result of previous mechanical trauma.
    - Elucidating the role of the chondrocyte cytoskeleton, particularly the vimentin intermediate filaments, in sensing mechanical load, and how these intracellular networks transduce mechanical signals into a biochemical response in articular cartilage.
    - Delineating the role of the canonical and non-canonical WNT pathways in transducing mechanical signals in articular cartilage.

    Biosketch: Emma Blain is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, UK. Emma Blain obtained her PhD in cartilage mechanobiology from the Connective Tissue Laboratories, Cardiff University and has remained there, initially as a post-doctoral researcher before becoming a faculty member. Herresearch elucidates the cellular and molecular events that are involved in the mechano-regulation of articular cartilage homeostasis, the mechanism/s that propagate mechanically-mediated joint degeneration and identification of therapeutic targets for intervention. A co-applicant of the Versus Arthritis Biomechanics and Bioengineering Research Centre (Cardiff University), she has established cell, explant and animal models to investigate how mechanical load influences joint homeostasis and pathology. Her current projectsare centred on three interlinking themes:(i) identifying novel mechanotransduction pathways that influence cartilage chondrocyte homeostasis e.g. miRNAs, Wnt signalling, (ii) understanding how aberrant regulation of these signalling pathways can result in cartilage destruction propagated by abnormal mechanical load, and (iii) using this knowledge to identify targeted interventions to delay/halt osteoarthritis progression. She has led a number of research projects (with external funding from Versus Arthritis, MRC, EPSRC, Dunhill Medical Trust, Orthopaedic Research UK), invented a patent and currently collaborates with academics and clinicians.

  • 13:30 - 14:30
    Lunch - Cafeteria Campus
  • 14:30 - 16:30
    Hands-on Sessions - Rooms Tallers

    1) Cartilage multi-scale modelling, from human body motion to tissue turnover 

    2) Thrombus formation in Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) in Atrial Fibrillation (AF) patients

    3) Robotic arm programming and tissue modelling for image-guided brain surgery

    4) Multiscale systems biology modelling to simulate (i) the emergence of atheroma in atherosclerosis, (ii) cartilage homeostasis in osteoarthritis

    5) Stratification of patients with complex phenotypes

    6) Lumbar spine statistical shape and finite element modelling to predict surgery mechanical failure

  • 16:30 - 17:00
    Coffee & Poster Session - Hall Tallers
  • 17:30 - 19:30
    Hands-on Sessions - Rooms Tallers

    1) Cartilage multi-scale modelling, from human body motion to tissue turnover 

    2) Thrombus formation in Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) in Atrial Fibrillation (AF) patients

    3) Robotic arm programming and tissue modelling for image-guided brain surgery

    4) Multiscale systems biology modelling to simulate (i) the emergence of atheroma in atherosclerosis, (ii) cartilage homeostasis in osteoarthritis

    5) Stratification of patients with complex phenotypes

    6) Lumbar spine statistical shape and finite element modelling to predict surgery mechanical failure

9
Jun 2020
  • 09:30 - 11:00
    Keynote Lecture 2 - Bart Bijnens (Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer - IDIBAPS, ICREA) - Auditorium - Chair: Gemma Piella, UPF
  • 11:00 - 11:30
    Coffee Break - Hall Auditorium
  • 11:30 - 12:30
    Plenary Lecture 3 - Laoise McNamara (National University of Ireland, Galway) - Auditorium - Chair: Simone Tassani, UPF

    Integrative exploration of bone mechanotransduction

    Abstract: Mechanobiology is an emerging field at the interface of biology and engineering, which seeks to understand the mechanisms by which biological cells sense and respond to mechanical signals. Professor McNamara’s research group use multidisciplinary approaches to derive understanding of bone mechanobiology and how this process contributes to development, physiology and bone disease. The Mechanobiology and Medical Device Research Group (www.mechanobiology.ie) uses experimental and computational techniques to identify the specific mechanosensation and mechanotransduction mechanisms by which bone cells sense mechanical stimuli. These studies have contributed a novel understanding of changes in bone mechanobiology during osteoporosis. This research has been applied to understand the role of mechanical stimulation in bone regeneration and to develop in vitro tissue regeneration strategies that exploit mechanobiological responses to overcome challenges in the field of bone tissue engineering.

    Biosketch: Professor Laoise McNamara is a Professor in Biomedical Engineering at the National University of Ireland, Galway. She holds a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Trinity College Dublin and a 1st class Honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from NUI Galway. She completed Postdoctoral training at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, USA. From 2007-2009 she was a Lecturer in Mechanobiology and Musculoskeletal Biomechanics at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom. She was appointed to NUI Galway in 2009 as a Science Foundation Stokes Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering. She established the Mechanobiology and Medical Device Research team at NUI Galway (www.mechanobiology.ie). Her research group have published widely, and have attracted significant prizes and funding, most notably the European Research Council (ERC) Consolidator Award (2019) and an ERC Starting Independent Researcher Award (2011), a Science Foundation Ireland Investigators Grant (2016), the Irish Research Council (IRC) Laureate Award (2018) and various other Health Research Board, SFI and Irish Research Council funding. She was awarded the Irish Research Council “Researcher of the Year” award in 2019.” She has interdisciplinary research collaborations with researchers at Georgia Tech, Notre Dame University, City College of New York, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Tampere University of Technology, INSERM Nantes and the University of Southampton. She collaborates with Stryker, Boston Scientific and Medtronic.

  • 12:30 - 13:30
    Plenary Lecture 4 - Jordi García-Ojalvo (Universitat Pompeu Fabra) - Auditorium - Chair: Giulia Ruzzene, UPF

    The role of dynamic processes in living systems

    Abstract: Nature is dynamic and nonlinear. From celestial bodies orbiting around each other and emitting radiation in a pulsed manner, to the ever changing climate and geology of our own planet, natural phenomena are governed by the laws of nonlinear dynamical systems. This also applies to living systems, which exhibit all kinds of time-varying behavior. Nonlinearities in the interactions among the system components and in the response to external perturbations, together with random fluctuations of both internal and external origin, complicate our understanding of the dynamic world. The goal of our lab is to study and characterize the dynamical behavior of living systems, and use this knowledge to understand how these systems operate and self-organize in complex yet well-coordinated processes. The phenomena that we study include synchronization, noise-induced phenomena, pattern formation, excitability, and limit-cycle behavior, among others. The living systems whose behavior we examine include bacteria, stem cells, the immune system, and the brain. In these systems we explore processes such as gene regulation, intra- and inter-cellular signaling, cortical oscillations, and information processing.

    Biosketch: Jordi Garcia-Ojalvo obtained his PhD in statistical physics at the University of Barcelona in 1995. He did postdoctoral work at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta in 1996, working on laser dynamics, and at the Humboldt University of Berlin in 1998 as an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow, studying noise effects in excitable media and neuronal systems. In 2003 he was IGERT Visiting Professor at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, at which time he began working in the field of systems biology. In 2008 he became Full Professor at the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, where he had been teaching applied physics since 1991. He is Visiting Research Associate in Biology at the California Institute of Technology since 2006, and joined the Universitat Pompeu Fabra as Full Professor in October 2012, where he leads the laboratory of Dynamical Systems Biology. His laboratory studies the dynamics of living systems, from unicellular organisms to human beings. He uses a variety of experimental biochemical and electrophysiological data to constrain computational models of living systems, and thereby unravel the underlying mechanisms of physiological processes in both natural and synthetic systems.

  • 13:30 - 14:30
    Lunch - Cafeteria Campus
  • 14:30 - 16:30
    Hands-on Sessions - Rooms Tallers

    1) Cartilage multi-scale modelling, from human body motion to tissue turnover 

    2) Thrombus formation in Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) in Atrial Fibrillation (AF) patients

    3) Robotic arm programming and tissue modelling for image-guided brain surgery

    4) Multiscale systems biology modelling to simulate (i) the emergence of atheroma in atherosclerosis, (ii) cartilage homeostasis in osteoarthritis

    5) Stratification of patients with complex phenotypes

    6) Lumbar spine statistical shape and finite element modelling to predict surgery mechanical failure

  • 16:30 - 17:00
    Coffee & Poster Session - Hall Tallers
  • 17:00 - 19:30
    Hands-on Sessions - Rooms Tallers

    1) Cartilage multi-scale modelling, from human body motion to tissue turnover 

    2) Thrombus formation in Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) in Atrial Fibrillation (AF) patients

    3) Robotic arm programming and tissue modelling for image-guided brain surgery

    4) Multiscale systems biology modelling to simulate (i) the emergence of atheroma in atherosclerosis, (ii) cartilage homeostasis in osteoarthritis

    5) Stratification of patients with complex phenotypes

    6) Lumbar spine statistical shape and finite element modelling to predict surgery mechanical failure

10
Jun 2020
  • 09:30 - 11:00
    Keynote Lecture 3 - Ralph Müller (ETH Zürich) - Auditorium - Chair: Jérôme Noailly, UPF

    Targeting the mechanomics of bone adaptation and regeneration

    Abstract: Ralph's laboratory for Bone Biomechanics aims at providing a bridge between biologists, who have brought molecular and cellular components within the realm of engineering, and engineers, who have brought the methods of measurement, analysis, synthesis, and control within the realm of molecular and cell biology. More specifically, new developments in biomechanical research are aimed at the quantification and modelling of bone at the molecular, cellular, and organ level incorporating novel principles and techniques of mechanics, imaging, and in silico modelling applied to the areas of tissue engineering and regeneration, systems mechanobiology and personalized medicine.

    Biosketch: Dr. Müller is currently a Professor of Biomechanics at the Department of Health Sciences and Technology and heads the Laboratory for Bone Biomechanics at ETH Zürich in Switzerland. He studied electrical engineering at ETH Zürich, where he also received his doctoral degree. Subsequently, he was involved in the development of a compact desktop micro-tomographic imaging system that since has been commercialized and is now marketed worldwide. The research he has completed and is currently pursuing employs state-of-the-art biomechanical testing and simulation techniques as well as novel bioimaging and visualization strategies for musculoskeletal tissues. He is an author of over 500 peer-reviewed publications in international scientific journals and conference proceedings. His work has been cited over 33,000 times on Google Scholar with an h-index of 93. He has received numerous awards and in 2015 was elected to both the Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences (SATW) and as a Fellow of the European Alliance for Medical and Biological Engineering and Science (EAMBES). In 2017, the European Research Council (ERC) awarded him with a prestigious ERC Advanced Grant. He is a former President of the European Society of Biomechanics (ESB) and the Swiss Society for Biomedical Engineering (SSBE) and currently serves on the Board of Directors of the International Federation of Musculoskeletal Research Societies (IFMRS) representing the International Society of Bone Morphometry (ISBM).

  • 11:00 - 11:30
    Coffee Break - Hall Auditorium
  • 11:30 - 12:30
    Plenary Lecture 5 - Jérôme Noailly (Universitat Pompeu Fabra) - Auditorium - Chair: Emma Blain, Cardiff University

    Systems mechanobiology: exploring the multifactorial regulation of load-bearing tissues and organs 

    Abstract: Despite important advances in the development and in the use of both diagnostic and treatment tools in medicine, the management of highly multifactorial conditions of load-bearing organs and tissues remains poorly efficient. Over the last decades, numerical models in  biomechanics have allowed improving our understanding of several conditions, which is partly due to top-down rational explorations of the likely role of mechanical factors in the multifaceted regulation of the function of load-bearing tissues in health and disease. Yet, the translation of mechanical predictions into biology-based rationales remains a major challenge, to target promising biomarkers for prevention, early diagnosis and treatment. Theoretical tissue constitutive models in continuum mechanics can explicitly integrate tissue composition parameters through multiphysics and/or multiscale modelling, and pave the way to mechanistic descriptions of couplings through which organ and tissue biomechanics are affected by composition changes, the latter being regulated by dynamic cell behaviours in multifactorial micro-environments. Models and simulation technologies, including regulatory networks, rule-based, agent-based and finite element modelling, appear necessary to rationally interpolate organ- and cell-level evidences and achieve an educated use of simulation results to build new concepts for improved diagnosis and prevention. Applications cases include arthropathies, lung emphysema, osteoporosis and atherosclerosis.

    Biosketch: Jérôme Noailly began his PhD in 2002 at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona, Spain. He explored the mechanical communications within the lumbar spine through finite element modelling, and he addressed model approximation and reliability issues. In 2009, he received the best PhD thesis award in engineering from the UPC. From 2007 to 2011, he was a Marie Sklodowska-Curie postdoctoral fellow, first at the AO Research Institute (Davos, Switzerland) and the Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands), and then at the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona, Spain. At IBEC, he focused on soft tissue and multiphysics modelling, and in 2012 he became the head of the group of Biomechanics and Mechanobiology (BMMB) and started to combine systems biology models. In 2015, he moved to the Universistat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), and merged the BMMB expertise with that of BCN MedTech. Jérôme was the principal investigator of the EU project MySpine, and he is regularly in charge of clinical and technological transfer activities in computational biomechanics with companies and hospitals. In 2016 he was awarded a Ramon y Cajal Fellowship by the Spanish Government and in 2019, Jérôme became Tenure Track Professor at UPF. He is Chair of the Student Committee of the Virtual Physiological Human Institute (VPHi), member of the Council of the European Society of Biomechanics (ESB) and past president of the Spanish National Chapter of the ESB.

  • 12:30 - 13:30
    Plenary Lecture 6 - Ioannis Xenarios (University of Lausanne, Health 2030 Genome Center) - Auditorium - Chair: Laura Baumgartner, UPF

    Knowledge-based network modelling of complex molecular systems in diseases

    Abstract: Knowledge graph and computable models are becoming entities that tries to capture the complexity of biological systems and encode this information into a structure that is reusable and linkable. Cellular models used in systems biology have emerged over the last decade as useful media to map, compute and sometimes predict in-silico cellular behavior. The presentation will tackle with a set of examples how computable models requires accurate and community maintained ontologies. The emergence as well of linked data being an essential component of this eco-system.

    Biosketch: Ioannis Xenarios is a trained computational immunologist who received a PhD from the University of Lausanne and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. During his study he taught bioinformatics and computational biology in the early days of bioinformatics to student in biochemistry. At the end of his PhD he moved to UCLA University of California Los Angeles where he worked on several comparative genomics and interactions databases to study complexity of cellular networks. He then moved to Serono (later bought by Merck into Merck-Serono) to lead the development in proteomics and genomics in both translational and early discovery. He then led the group of Vital-IT and Swiss-Prot at the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics for eleven years where he developed with his team methods in non invasive prenatal diagnostic, early biomarker discovery in diabetes, neo-antigen, systems immunology in cancer biology, integrative biology and proteogenomics approaches, until 2018. He is now professor of computational biology and bioinformatics at the University of Lausanne and Chief Data Analyst at the Health 2030 Genome Center, Geneva, where he leads the establishment of the Data Analytics and Interpretation Platform. Ioannis Xenarios served on several national and international body (ESFRI, IMI-JU, FRM and several computational and non-computational journals).

  • 13:30 - 14:30
    Lunch - Cafeteria Campus
  • 14:30 - 16:30
    Hands-on Sessions - Rooms Tallers

    1) Cartilage multi-scale modelling, from human body motion to tissue turnover 

    2) Thrombus formation in Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) in Atrial Fibrillation (AF) patients

    3) Robotic arm programming and tissue modelling for image-guided brain surgery

    4) Multiscale systems biology modelling to simulate (i) the emergence of atheroma in atherosclerosis, (ii) cartilage homeostasis in osteoarthritis

    5) Stratification of patients with complex phenotypes

    6) Lumbar spine statistical shape and finite element modelling to predict surgery mechanical failure

  • 16:30 - 17:00
    Coffee & Poster Session - Hall Tallers
  • 17:00 - 18:00
    Hands-on Sessions - Rooms Tallers

    1) Cartilage multi-scale modelling, from human body motion to tissue turnover 

    2) Thrombus formation in Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) in Atrial Fibrillation (AF) patients

    3) Robotic arm programming and tissue modelling for image-guided brain surgery

    4) Multiscale systems biology modelling to simulate (i) the emergence of atheroma in atherosclerosis, (ii) cartilage homeostasis in osteoarthritis

    5) Stratification of patients with complex phenotypes

    6) Lumbar spine statistical shape and finite element modelling to predict surgery mechanical failure

  • 18:00 - 19:30
    VPH Honorary Lecture - Alfons Hoekstra (University of Amsterdam) - Auditorium

    Multiscale modelling and high performance multiscale computing in biomedicine

    Abstract: Alfons Hoekstra’s research focuses on modelling and simulating complex systems, with an emphasis on multiscale models of human physiology and pathology. He helped to create the‘Virtual Physiological Human’ and contributed to the ‘Virtual Artery’, a multiscale model of the cardiovascular system. The latter includes both low-dimensional models of systemic blood flow and highly detailed models in which all individual red and white blood cells and platelets are modelled in plasma suspension.  Alfons additionally develops models of the arterial wall which explicitly include the behaviour of specific cells, such as smooth muscle cells. He then applies these models to cases such as thrombosis, intracranial aneurysms and arterial tissue reactions to stenting. He further develops methods and techniques for simulating these complex multiscale models on the most powerful supercomputers. He has worked in close collaboration with international computing centres to create the ‘Multiscale Modelling and Simulation Framework’. Current research work also focuses on models for human physiology and pathology in the elderly, as well as models which explicitly take into account the impact of socio-economic environmental factors and psychological factors on health and disease. A key question is how such multiscale models can be efficiently simulated on the most powerful supercomputers in the world, and how this computing power can be used to calculate the impact of uncertainties in these multiscale models and the model parameters on the final result of the simulation. Such concept of multiscale ‘uncertainty quantification’ is still in its infancy and will be an important topic of research in the years ahead.

    Biosketch: Alfons Hoekstra is full professor Computational Science & Engineering and director of Informatics Institute at the University of Amsterdam. He is also a member of the Computational Science Lab. He is project director of several large European projects. He was involved in the film ‘Virtual Humans’, which shows the possibilities of using high-performance computing (HPC) to delve deeper into the processes that take place in the human body. Virtual Humans was produced as part of the CompBioMed project. Hoekstra is editor of the Journal of Computational Science

  • 19:30 - 21:00
    Catalan Beer Tasting - Campus Guttenberg Square
11
Jun 2020
  • 09:30 - 11:00
    Keynote Lecture 4 - Irene Vignon-Clementel (INRIA) - Auditorium - Chair: Oscar Cámara, UPF

    Multiscale computational haemodynamics of organ or vascular diseases to explore their surgical treatment

    Abstract: Hemodynamics modeling has become mature enough to simulate local fluid dynamics changes due to a surgery or device implantation. However taking into account their interactions with the rest of the circulation, or even the downstream vascular bed not accessible by imaging remains challenging. We will present several computational methods that have been developed to tackle this issue for patient-specific image-based modeling. We will demonstrate through several examples including congenital heart disease, valve defects, aortic abdominal aneurysm and liver disease, how such simulations can be performed by including morphological and functional data. We will also illustrate what they can bring in this context: for example, by testing separately or all together, the effects of disease worsening and intervention, or by being the basis for a risk predictor through combination with machine learning.

    Biosketch: Irene Vignon-Clementel, PhD is Directrice de recherche (Prof. equiv.) at Inria, the French national institute for research in digital science and technology. She holds a ‘habilitation’ degree in Applied Mathematics (Sorbonne U.), a PhD in mechanical engineering (Stanford University), an MS in Applied Mathematics (DAMTP, Cambridge U.) and a diplôme d’ingénieur from Ecole Centrale Paris (France). Her research focuses on modeling and numerical simulations of physiological flows to better understand certain pathophysiologies and their treatment (surgical planning, medical device design), especially around blood circulation and breathing. This requires developing models of different complexities, coupling them, that their numerical implementation is robust, and that their parameters are based on medical or experimental data specific to a subject. Applications include liver, respiratory and congenital heart diseases. She has written over 70 publications and several book chapters, is member of several conference committees and an associate editor of IJNMBE. Dr. Vignon-Clementel has been working with companies and clinicians as a PI in a number of national and international grants (such as a Leducq transatlantic network of excellence), and is the recipient of an ERC consolidator grant. She has been actively promoting the applied mathematics/bioengineering and medicine interface through co-supervision of MD-PhDs, joint research projects, conference organization and interface articles with clinicians.

  • 11:00 - 11:30
    Coffee Break - Hall Auditorium
  • 11:30 - 12:30
    Plenary Lecture 7 - Stéphane Avril (Écoles des Mines St Etienne) - Auditorium - Chair: Jordi Mill, UPF

    Multiscale modelling, tissue characterization and inverse methods toward the Aortic Digital Twin 

    Abstract: The fluid mechanics community has been interested for many years in hemodynamics. More recently, significant endeavours of the solid mechanics community have permitted to establish constitutive equations and to achieve stress analyses in arterial lesions (atheromatous plaque in coronary or carotid arteries, aneurysms of the aorta). The mechanical properties of blood vessels have often been characterized ex vivo, but medical imaging, including MRI, now allows non-intrusive identifications in vivo. The spatial heterogeneity of these mechanical properties, even at the macroscopic scale, remains poorly explored despite its undeniable interest in understanding the mechanisms of remodeling and degeneration of the tissue. We are interested in the problem of identifying the fields of mechanical properties of aneurysms of the aorta. Scientific barriers are related to the complex geometry, the nonlinear and anisotropic behavior of tissues, the multiaxial loading conditions, and to the measurement of a local response in these tissues. Our identification approaches, based on digital image correlation field measurements and inverse methods, have demonstrated the link between the heterogeneity of mechanical properties and the existence of localized failure modes. A micromechanical approach has also made it possible to develop a mechanobiological model to reproduce the behavior of the aorta in surgical situations and a simulation software is being developed in a start-up for assistance to medicine and personalized surgery in the cardiovascular field. 

    Biosketch: Stéphane Avril is a distinguished Full Professor at Institut Mines Telecom affiliated at Mines Saint-Etienne in France. He runs a group of 20+ in soft tissue biomechanics, with a special focus on constitutive modeling and identification using imaging techniques. He was the director of the CIS center for biomedical and healthcare engineering (70+ people) between 2010 and 2020 and has been the deputy director of SAINBIOSE (INSERM endorsed laboratory with 100+ researchers) since 2016. Stéphane received his PhD in mechanical and civil engineering in 2002 at Mines Saint-Etienne (France). After positions at Arts et Métiers ParisTech (France) and Loughborough University (UK) where he developed the Virtual Fields Methods, Stéphane returned to his alma mater in 2008 and extended his broad experience of inverse problems to soft tissue biomechanics, especially regarding aortic aneurisms in close collaboration with vascular surgeons. Stéphane was a visiting Professor at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor (USA) in 2008 and has been a visiting professor at Yale University since 2014. Stéphane has received many awards and distinctions including ICCB best communication award (2017), Editor’s Choice Paper Finalist – ASME Journal of Biomechanical Engineering (2016), ESB best poster award (2015), BSSM 50th Anniversary Plenary Speaker (2014). He has led two national ANR grants in soft tissue biomechanics and supervised 25+ PhD students. In 2015, Stéphane was awarded an ERC (European Research Council) consolidator grant of 2m€ for the Biolochanics project on: Localization in biomechanics and mechanobiology of aneurysms: Towards personalized medicine. Most of Stéphane’s research is aimed at improving the treatment of cardiovascular diseases by assisting physicians and surgeons with biomechanical numerical simulations. In 2017, Stéphane co-founded Predisurge, a spin-off company of IMT at Mines Saint-Etienne. PrediSurge offers innovative software solutions for patient-specific numerical simulation of surgical procedures. First applications in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) enable the automatic design of fully-customized fenestrated stent-grafts. Preliminary evaluations reveal huge benefits for the 20000+ patients requiring fenestrated EVAR every year: faster procedures, increased precision, near-zero risk of complications. Our vision for 2025 is that all EVAR procedures will have to be numerically simulated for ensuring the highest degree of safety.

  • 12:30 - 13:30
    Plenary Lecture 8 - Sara Checa (Charité) - Auditorium - Chair: Carlos Ruiz Wills, UPF

    Hybrid modelling in bone regeneration and tissue engineering

    Abstract: Sara’s research group develops computer tools to investigate the mechano-biological regulation of the bone regeneration process and to develop strategies for the treatment of impaired healing. Among others, she investigates the potential of tissue engineering scaffolds for the support of bone repair, where she develops computer tools to investigate scaffold-supported bone healing and to optimize those structures to support the bone repair.

    Biosketch: Sara Checa is assistant Professor on Computational Mechanobiology at the Charite Medical School Berlin and invited Professor at the Technical University Berlin. She holds a PhD in Computational Biomechanics from the University of Southampton and a degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Malaga. She has conducted post-doctoral research at Trinity College Dublin, at the Julius Wolff Institute in Berlin and at Stanford University in the USA. She is currently a group leader at the Julius Wolff Institute, specializing in computer modeling of mechano-biological processes with a focus on bone healing and adaptation at the tissue and cellular scales. She is an author of more than 40 publications in peer-reviewed journals, several book chapters and more than 80 contributions to International and National Conferences.

  • 13:30 - 14:30
    Lunch - Cafeteria Campus
  • 14:30 - 16:30
    Hands-on Sessions - Rooms Tallers

    1) Cartilage multi-scale modelling, from human body motion to tissue turnover 

    2) Thrombus formation in Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) in Atrial Fibrillation (AF) patients

    3) Robotic arm programming and tissue modelling for image-guided brain surgery

    4) Multiscale systems biology modelling to simulate (i) the emergence of atheroma in atherosclerosis, (ii) cartilage homeostasis in osteoarthritis

    5) Stratification of patients with complex phenotypes

    6) Lumbar spine statistical shape and finite element modelling to predict surgery mechanical failure

  • 16:30 - 17:00
    Coffee & Poster Session - Hall Tallers
  • 16:30 - 17:30
    PARALLEL ACTIVITY: Visit MareNostrum - Barcelona Supercomputing Center (Registered persons ONLY)
  • 17:00 - 19:30
    Hands-on Sessions - Rooms Tallers

    1) Cartilage multi-scale modelling, from human body motion to tissue turnover 

    2) Thrombus formation in Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) in Atrial Fibrillation (AF) patients

    3) Robotic arm programming and tissue modelling for image-guided brain surgery

    4) Multiscale systems biology modelling to simulate (i) the emergence of atheroma in atherosclerosis, (ii) cartilage homeostasis in osteoarthritis

    5) Stratification of patients with complex phenotypes

    6) Lumbar spine statistical shape and finite element modelling to predict surgery mechanical failure

12
Jun 2020
  • 08:45 - 09:30
    Workshop - Juan E Riese (Institute of Health Carlos III) - Auditorium - Chair: Carme Buisan, UPF

    EU strategy and funding schemes in health and wellbeing

    Biosketch: Juan E. Riese owns a PhD in Chemical sciences (Biochemistry) from the University of Valencia (Spain), an MBA by the Polytechnic University of Madrid specialized in management of technological innovation, and a Master in Management of R&D&I in Health sciences by the University of Alcala de Henares, UNED and National School of Health (Spain). As a biomedical researcher he has worked mainly in the identification of biomarkers in tumors and in Alzheimer’s disease during 20 years as researcher in Germany and Spain in the academia (University and hospitals) and in the pharmaceutical industry. He has held positions on R&I management and business development in biotech companies in Spain. Currently he is Scientific & Technical Advisor for researchers working at the Spanish National Healthcare System at the Health Institute ‘Carlos III’ in Madrid as National Contact Point for the Societal Challenge 1 ‘Health, Demographic Change and Wellbeing’ of Horizon 2020 and the Innovative Medicines Initiative. He is National Expert of the Spanish Delegation for the Societal Challenge 1 of Horizon 2020.

  • 09:30 - 11:00
    Keynote Lecture 5 - Blanca Jordan (Atos Research) - Auditorium - Chair: Bart Bijnens, IDIBAPS, ICREA
  • 11:00 - 11:30
    Coffee Break - Hall Auditorium
  • 11:30 - 12:30
    Plenary Lecture 9 - Thierry Marchal (ANSYS, Avicenna Alliance) - Auditorium - Chair: Mario Ceresa, UPF

    Models and Simulations for Predictive, Personalised and Safer Medicine

    Abstract: When healthcare providers optimize treatments for the average person, they are effectively optimizing it for no one in particular. As a result, the medical industry is starting to embrace the idea of personalized medicine and in silico testing. Personalized medicine is the idea of tailoring a medical treatment for the individual — not the masses. To achieve this level of optimization, medical practitioners use simulations, models and digital twins of their patients to perform in silico tests. Healthcare is rapidly embracing digital twin technology. The goal of this trend is to deliver data-driven personalized medicine. Digital twins are built on computer-based, or in silico, models that are fed individual and population data. Researchers are aided by these digital representations of human physiology in their studies of disease, new drugs and devices. Healthcare industry leaders and FDA authorities suggest that digital twins help to accelerate medical innovation and regulatory approval. In the future, these tools may even help doctors accurately optimize the performance of patient-specific treatment plans. In short, digital twins can help healthcare providers bring lifesaving innovations to market faster, at reduced costs and with increased patient safety.

    Biosketch: Thierry Marchal is the Secretary General of the Avicenna Alliance with a mission to lead medical devices, pharmaceutical and biotech companies through the in silico and personalized medicine (r)evolution by closely interacting with industrial innovators and SMEs, academic leaders, governmental and regulatory authorities such as the FDA and the EMA or clinicians and patients organizations. Thierry is also a member of the eHealth Stakeholder Group which provides advice and expertise to the European Commission.  As the ANSYS Global Industry Director for Healthcare and Sports since 2006, his primary position, Thierry defines and executes the ANSYS strategy for this important industry. Thierry holds a degree in Mechanical Engineering and a MBA in Marketing both from Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.

  • 12:30 - 13:30
    Preparation time for Hands-on presentations - Auditorium
  • 13:30 - 14:30
    Lunch - Cafeteria Campus
  • 14:30 - 15:30
    Hands-on Presentations, QUAES Best Hands-on Award, VPHi Best Poster Award - Auditorium

    8´ hands-on presentations: 

    1) Cartilage multi-scale modelling, from human body motion to tissue turnover 

    2) Thrombus formation in Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) in Atrial Fibrillation (AF) patients

    3) Robotic arm programming and tissue modelling for image-guided brain surgery

    4) Multiscale systems biology modelling to simulate (i) the emergence of atheroma in atherosclerosis, (ii) cartilage homeostasis in osteoarthritis

    5) Stratification of patients with complex phenotypes

    6) Lumbar spine statistical shape and finite element modelling to predict surgery mechanical failure

  • 15:30 - 17:00
    QUAES Round Table "In silico Medicine and new medical technologies for the society: Awareness, expectations and effective capacity" - Auditorium

    Confirmed participants:

    Rossana Alessandrello, Value Based Procurement Director, Innovation Unit, Agency for Health Quality and Assessment of Catalonia (AQuAS), Departament of Health | Generalitat de Catalunya.

    Blanca Jordan, Health Sector Manager at Atos Research and Innovation center, Spain.

    Juan E Riese, Scientific Advisor at the Institute of Health Carlos III, National Contact Point for the H2020 and Innovative Medicine Initiative EU Programmes in Health, Demographic Change and Wellbeing 

  • 17:00 - 18:00
    Summer School Closure (Auditorium) and Farewell Drinks (Hall Auditorium)

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