Emagister Eventos

Organizado por The Economist

China Summit

  • Fechas:

    Del 01/11/10 al 02/11/10

  • Lugar:

    beijing, china, Pekín, República Popular China (mapa)

Descripción ↑ subir

As the dust of the recent economic crisis begins to settle, a new landscape is emerging. For many countries, the terrain is unsettling: an environment of austerity, low-growth, high risk and curtailed ambition. Against this backdrop, the resilient rise of China stands in deep contrast. Its economy is forecast to sail past Japan’s this year to become the world’s second biggest. The country’s geopolitical influence is expanding at a similar pace, while China’s companies grow ever bolder and its people ever more educated. The waves created by this seismic shift are surging across the globe. And yet, for all the seeming predictability of its rise, few people truly understand China’s gathering impact on global economics, business, politics, governance, science and society.

Organised by Economist Conferences, the China Summit draws together a broad range of business leaders, politicians, policy-makers and academics to debate and discuss these critical questions. With The Economist’s characteristic clarity and wit, and a passion for overturning dogma, the forum offers fresh and challenging perspectives on the role, risks and opportunities of China in a post-crisis world.

Topics for discussion include:

  • How have China’s ambitions changed? What new policies will the government use to achieve them?
  • The world’s most exciting economy? China’s economy continues to power forward – how might the nature of growth and economic activity in the country change?
  • Does increasing influence upset “the peaceful rise”? Will China become a more vocal player on the international stage?
  • Economic pragmatist or political ideologue: what does China stand for?
  • Will China grow old before it grows rich? What is the outlook for the Chinese consumer over the next 20 years?
  • Will urbanisation in China be a positive experience?
  • The China opportunity: exciting or exasperating? How level is the playing field for foreign businesses, private Chinese firms, and state-owned enterprises?
  • China’s dynamic private sector: Chinese firms have learnt much from Western businesses. What can the West, in turn, learn from China’s emerging corporate giants?
  • Pirate or pioneer: fostering innovation in China
  • Governance: China’s evolving relationship with its citizens: How will China’s systems evolve?

To reserve your seat or corporate table, please contact us at (852) 2585 3312 or conferencesasia@economist.com

Lugar ↑ subir

Programa ↑ subir

Keynote opening speech from a senior government representative

  • How do the authorities view China's changing role in the world?
  • To what degree has the crisis made China more confident and in what ways has it made it more cautious?
  • How have China's ambitions changed?
  • And what new policies will the government use to achieve them?

The world's most exciting economy?
Despite the widespread wreckage of the recent financial crisis, China's economy continues to power forward. This year it becomes the world's second largest economy. By 2024, it is forecast to overtake the US and become number one, a mantle it last held in teh early 1800s. But as China pushes to reclaim its crown, will the nature of growth and economic activity in teh country change?

China in a multi-polor world: does increasing influence upset "the peaceful rise"?

The emergence of new powers typically causes great friction as established players concede ground to ambitious rivals. But China's ascendancy to date has been surprisingly smooth. The country's leaders, ever careful to promote the notion of "peaceful rise", have used great skill in steering their course quietly and efficiently. ANd yet, as China's influence in the world continues to grow, it will become ever more embroiled in issues such as resourecs scarcity, enviornmental concerns, changing political allegiances, clashes of ideology, and economic rivalry.

Economic pragmatist or political ideologue: what does China stand for?

  • Does China have an identifiable national character? And what does it stand for?
  • Can the country be understood as one nation, or is it a tightly-bound collection of different ones?
  • Does the government have a clear ideology? A defining set of political, social and cultural values?
  • Or is economic pragmatism its defining feature?

Will China grow old before it grows rich?

  • What is the outlook for the Chinese consumer over the next 20years?
  • What characterises the consumer market, and how should businesses approach it?
  • Income disparities between wealthy coastal cities and poor inland regions remain both large and potentially divisive. Will the government succeed in tackling growing inequality?
  • What impact will an ageing population have on the prospects for growth and consumption? And how is the government preparing for its coming demographic challenges?

Will urbanisation in China be a positive experience?

  • What are the patterns of urban development in China?
  • How can and should business get involved?
  • How sustainable is the process of urbanisation at present?
  • Are regulatory enviornments and incentives sufficient to encourage sustainable urban development?

The China opportunity: exciting or exasperating?

  • In what ways has the recent crisis shifted the appetite of the authorities for market liberalisation?
  • Are foreign companies less welcome today than they once were? Does the warmth of their reception depend on the sector they are in?
  • How level is the playing field for foreign businesses, private Chinese firms, and state-owned enterprises?
  • How are foreign companies shifting the way they approach China in light of a changing reform agenda?

Who dares wins: China's dynamic private sector

  • How does entrepreneurship work in China?
  • How has China's private sector learned to cope with its challenges, and what character does that impart on their future development?
  • The first wave of overseas acquisitions by Chinese firms was of mixed success. Will subsequent rounds do better?
  • Chinese firms have learnt much from Western businesses. What can the West, in turn, learn from China's emerging corporate giants?

Priate or pioneer: fostering innovation in China

  • Where will China lead? Which industries? Which technologies?
  • How will government support influence the nature of science and innovation?
  • How important is China as a base for foreign firms to locate R&D facilities?
  • Innovation often requires freedom of creative expression. Will China's regulatory regime allow it?
  • What does China's burgeoning innovation mean for the enforcement of intellectual property rights?

Governance: China's evolving relationship with its citizens

  • As a middle class emerges, will it want greater say over how its lives and communities are governed?
  • Given the recent sucesses of workers in labour negotiations, is the balance of power between the Communist Party and the coutnry's citizens shifting?
  • Are China's workers becoming more vocal?
  • How will China's systems of social control, such as the hukou system, evolve?
  • What lies ahead for thorny issues such as property rights, corruption, and censorship of the interest?

Keynote closing speech: The contrarian perspective

Few investment themes these days come with more consensus than the rise of China. With the world's biggest population, sound government finances, resilient economic growth, and much else besides, few commentators dare to suggest the conesnsus is wrong. But if the outlook were to turn down, if disaster were to strike, what might cause it? Just as importantly, if China's course were suddenly to veer in a new direction - perhaps sideways rather than forward - what might bring about such a shift in course? Our closing keynote examines some of the lesser-discussed scenarios for China's future.

Patrocinadores ↑ subir